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What Can Cinnamon Do for You?

Cinnamon sticks with cinnamon powder

This blog has been compensated by OmniChannel Health Media and its advertiser. All opinions are mine alone.

The change of season brings the wonderful smells and flavors of fall cooking, like cinnamon. But cinnamon is more than just a tasty addition to pies and oatmeal. Research has shown that cinnamon has many health benefits.[1] So what can cinnamon do for you?

Cinnamon is believed to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which help reduce damage to our cells.

People with type 2 diabetes may also benefit from cinnamon.[2] Cinnamon may help metabolize glucose and increase insulin sensitivity.[3] Cinnamon may also help reduce fasting blood glucose and increase the body’s uptake of glucose.[4]

However, not all cinnamon is created equal. Most of the cinnamon in the grocery store is Cassia cinnamon. Cassia cinnamon has been used in many human clinical trials.  While it is fine in small amounts for food, it contains a compound, called coumarin, that you shouldn’t consume in large amounts or on a regular basis. Ceylon cinnamon, which is a little more expensive, contains less coumarin, but is not well studied.

CinSulin® is a water-extracted cinnamon ingredient with the undesirable coumarin removed and the remaining active compounds from the plant concentrated. For more information about CinSulin, available at your Costco warehouse and Costco.com, please visit cdiabetes.com/cinsulin

If you are interested in adding a cinnamon supplement to your daily routine, be sure to talk to your health care provider to see if it is right for you.

3 Ways to Better Manage Your Blood Sugar

  • Choose foods with more fiber. Dietary fiber has many health benefits, like keeping you feeling full and satisfied longer, and helping improve cholesterol. Fiber also helps avoid blood sugar spikes. To increase your fiber intake, choose whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and legumes. When choosing packaged foods like bread, cereal, or crackers, check the label for dietary fiber and try to choose ones with more fiber per serving.
  • Try a water-extracted cinnamon supplement. Studies have shown that cinnamon supplements may help to reduce fasting blood sugar and increase insulin sensitivity.[5]
  • Increase physical activity. Exercise can increase insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake, and stimulate muscles to take up more glucose. Exercise is also an important part of weight management. Remember, the best form of physical activity is the one that you enjoy. This will help you stay motivated – and relieve stress.

This blog has been compensated by OmniChannel Health Media and its advertiser. All opinions are mine alone.

The contents of the CDiabetes.com site, such as text, graphics, images, and other material contained on the CDiabetes.com site (“Content”) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on the CDiabetes.com site.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, cure, treat or prevent any disease.


[1] Ziegenfuss, Tim N., et al, 2006, Re: Water-Soluble Cinnamon Extract and Body Composition, Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 3(2): 45-53.

https://jissn.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1550-2783-3-2-45

 

[2] Roussel, Anne-Marie, et al, 2009, Re: Antioxidant Effects of a Cinnamon Extract, Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 28, No. 1, 16-21.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19571155

 

[3] Anderson, Richard A., Re: Chromium and Polyphenols from Cinnamon, lecture given at 2007 summer meeting of the Nutrition Society, University of Ulster.

https://www.cambridge.org/core/services/aop-cambridge-core/content/view/S0029665108006010

 

[4] Davis, Paul A., and Yokoyama, Wallace, 1993, Re: Cinnamon Intake and Fasting Blood Glucose: Meta-Analysis, Journal of Medicinal Food, 14 (0) 2011, 1 – 6.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0033234/

 

[5] Ziegenfuss, Tim N., et al, 2006, Re: Water-Soluble Cinnamon Extract and Body Composition, Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 3(2): 45-53.

https://jissn.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1550-2783-3-2-45

 

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